Bone Broth

bonebroth

Bone broth does not need much introduction. It has gained prominence as the ultimate gut-healing medicine. The key to its gut-healing property is the high level of glutamine, collagen and gelatin substance which are crucial components of intestinal mucous membranes.

Due to bone broth’s high level of glutamine, it is more suitable for use as a ‘second stage’ of gut-healing protocol after the use of meat stock.

Cooking time:

Fish: 1-3 hours     Chicken: 3-6 hours      Beef, lamb, pork: 6-12 hours

Instructions:

  1. Place bones of your choice in a large pot. For chicken bones, adding some chicken feet and head will create a thicker broth.
  2. Add sliced ginger
  3. Add apple cider vinegar, 2 tbsp per litre of water.
  4. Fill the pot with water covering two inches above the bones.
  5. Bring water to a boil and then turn down the heat to simmer.
  6. Continue simmering for the duration of time outlined above.
  7. When done, let the broth sit for an hour. Filter broth into a glass container and store in the fridge overnight.
  8. Bone broth will turn into a thick gel-like consistency after being in the fridge overnight. Observe how thick the broth is, so you can gauge how much water dilution needed before consumption.

Tip:

While fish and chicken bones will be spent after a single boil, pork, beef and lamb bones can be re-boiled multiple times producing several batches of bone broths from the same bones. However, the bones will produce thinner broth at each subsequent boiling.

If you need help overcoming any health challenges, please contact our Naturopath Bernard Chu at 0412 723 823 or email bernard@greenheartnaturalhealth.com.au for an obligation free discussion. Online consultation is available for your convenience to those living outside of Sydney, Australia.

 

bonebroth

Bone broth does not need much introduction. It has gained prominence as the ultimate gut-healing medicine. The key to its gut-healing property is the high level of glutamine, collagen and gelatin substance which are crucial components of intestinal mucous membranes.

Due to bone broth’s high level of glutamine, it is more suitable for use as a ‘second stage’ of gut-healing protocol after the use of meat stock.

Cooking time:

  • Fish: 1-3 hours
  • Chicken: 3-6 hours
  • Beef, lamb, pork: 6-12 hours

Instructions:

  1. Place bones of your choice in a large pot. For chicken bones, adding some chicken feet and head will create a thicker broth.
  2. Add sliced ginger
  3. Add apple cider vinegar, 2 tbsp per litre of water.
  4. Fill the pot with water covering two inches above the bones.
  5. Bring water to a boil and then turn down the heat to simmer.
  6. Continue simmering for the duration of time outlined above.
  7. When done, let the broth sit for an hour. Filter broth into a glass container and store in the fridge overnight.
  8. Bone broth will turn into a thick gel-like consistency after being in the fridge overnight. Observe how thick the broth is, so you can gauge how much water dilution needed before consumption.

If you need help overcoming any health challenges, please contact our Naturopath Bernard Chu at 0412 723 823 or email bernard@greenheartnaturalhealth.com.au for an obligation free discussion.

Online consultation is available for your convenience to those living outside of Sydney, Australia.

 

Soup/Stew Recipe Ideas:

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Meat Stock

Meat stock is a close cousin to bone broth, it’s amino acids profile is better suited for early-stage gut-healing than bone broth.

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Russian Borscht

Made from simple ingredients, Russian borscht is a beautiful and delicious hearty stew that is perfect for cold-weather dinner.

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Oxtail Stew Seasoned with Thyme

Imagine having a delicious and juicy stew during a cold night. Oxtail stew is the perfect hearty meal to warm you up in the cold winter.